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    WOMEN

    An interview with Actress Jodie Foster from Women.com

    Women.com: Back to the topic of leadership, what else can we be doing to promote leadership in women? 

    Foster: Well, I have this really outdated philosophy about success in a corporate structure, and you're going to think I'm really romantic and a fool, but here it goes. I think that if you are moral and you're right and you have the right ethics, that eventually somewhere down the line you're going to end up being successful. 

    In our business, anyway, you're always going up and down, and at some point you're going to find yourself down. You're going to need somebody to say, "Hey, I remember you. You're the one that treated me right, and I'm going to lend a hand out to you ..." It's your responsibility to conduct yourself ethically throughout the process always ethics first so that somewhere down the line, somebody's going to let you live up to your own potential. 

    Women.com: Do you live your life that way as well? 

    Foster: Yeah, I really do. I mean, I think I try to be the best person I can. Lord knows I make big mistakes. I make big mistakes all the time. But I try to be as honest and direct as I can. 

    A conversation with Jodie Foster about being a single mom in the glare of celebrity, By Tamar Laddy, Women.com, May 2000.


    As a pastor, a husband and a father, I have a dread of burying someone else's talents, particularly those bestowed on women. Accordingly, I have tried to scrutinize my views, the place of tradition, the thrust of theology and the force of my prejudices. Repeatedly, I have come back to this fact: If the Lord has given gifts, I had better be careful about denying freedom for their exercise. More than that, I need to ensure that the women in my life have every encouragement from me to be what He called and gifted them to be. A major part of my life must be spent as a man caring for, nurturing, encouraging and developing gifted women because they aren't the only ones who will give account for their stewardship. As a man in a male-oriented church, I may one day be asked about their gifts, too. I would like to be able to say I did considerably more than burying. A talent is a terrible thing to waste.

    Stuart Briscoe.


    Five major needs of women: 1) Affection, 2) Conversation, 3) Honesty and openness, 4) Financial support, 5) Family commitment.

    Five major needs of men: 1) Sexual fulfillment, 2) Recreational companionship, 3) An attractive spouse, 4) Domestic support, 5) Admiration. 

    C. Swindoll, His Needs, Her Needs, The Grace Awakening, Word, 1990, p. 256.


    Because a woman's vocal cords are shorter than a man's she can actually speak with less effort than he can. Shorter vocal cords not only cause a woman's voice to be more highly pitched, but also require less air to become agitated, making it possible for her to talk more with less energy expended. 

    Homemade, December 1984.


    John Cheever was asked if he would describe life with his wife, Mary. "She has displayed an extraordinary amount of patience," he answered. He paused, then continued, "Women are an inspiration. It's because of them we put on clean shirts and wash our necks. Because of women, we want to excel. Because of a woman, Christopher Columbus discovered America." 

    "Queen Isabella," Mary Cheever murmured.

     "I was thinking of Mrs. Columbus," He said, deadpan.

    Source Unknown.


    Some of us are becoming the men we wanted to marry. 

    Gloria Steinem in Ms. 


    Today's young women are more likely to become depressed than their mothers were and at a younger age. Reasons: increased economic pressure to contribute to family income...changing role in society...inability to meet their own expectations...a sense of having lost control. 

    Dr. Gerald Klerwan, in Homemade, December 1986.