Join Now: 1-800-777-7731
Home  |  Contact Us  |  About Us         Join eSermons
Log In Sign Up Now! Free Demo How To Use eSermons Memberhip Benefits

One Campaign
Sermon Samples
Contact Us
Special Sections
Member Log In
User Name: Password: Log In Join eSermons |  Help

SermonIllustrations.com
A       B       C       D       E       F       G       H       I      
J       K       L       M       N       O       P       Q       R      
S       T       U       V       W       X       Y       Z      
For even more resources
click here to join Sermons.com today!

  Join our FREE Illustrations Newsletter: Privacy Policy

    TREASURE

    Unless you subscribe to The Atlanta Journal Constitution, you probably missed the story that was in the May 17, 1987 edition.

    A rock hound named Rob Cutshaw owns a little roadside shop outside Andrews, North Carolina. Like many in the trade, he hunts for rocks, then sells them to collectors or jewelry makers. He knows enough about rocks to decide which to pick up and sell, but he's no expert. He leaves the appraising of his rocks to other people. As much as he enjoys the work, it doesn't always pay the bills. He occasionally moonlights, cutting wood to help put bread on the table.

    While on a dig twenty years ago, Rob found a rock he described as "purdy and big." He tried unsuccessfully to sell the specimen, and according to the Constitution, kept the rock under his bed or in his closet. He guessed the blue chunk could bring as much as $500 dollars, but he would have taken less if something urgent came up like paying his power bill. That's how close Rob came to hawking for a few hundred dollars what turned out to be the largest, most valuable sapphire ever found. The blue rock that Rob had abandoned to the darkness of a closet two decades ago -- now known as "The Star of David" sapphire -- weighs nearly a pound, and could easily sell for $2.75 million. 

    John MacArthur, Grace to You Newsletter, April 15, 1993.


    The body of David Livingstone was buried in England where he was born, but his heart was buried in the Africa he loved. At the foot of a tall tree in a small African village the natives dug a hole and placed in it the heart of this man who they loved and respected. If your heart were to be buried in the place you loved most during life, where would it be? In your pocketbook? In an appropriate space down at the office? Where is your heart?

    Source Unknown.


    One of the better known treasure hunts in modern times is the quest to find the rumored wealth known as the "Beale treasure."  The hunt began when an eccentric man, who left the East for the gold and silver mines of the West, returned home, supposedly hid a vast amount of wealth, then disappeared forever. All he left behind were several messages written in a mysterious code. One of those messages when deciphered told of the treasure and its approximate location. The other documents, then, would narrow down the site. Since the Beale documents first came to light, thousands of man-hours and hundreds of thousands of dollars have been spent attempting to break the codes and find the legendary treasure.

     Today in the Word, MBI, December, 1989, p. 14.