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    TRADITION

    To those who are argue that tradition can kill a church: The second time you do anything it becomes a tradition. 

    Brett Blair.


    A very poor holy man lived in a remote part of China. Every day before his time of meditation in order to show his devotion, he put a dish of butter up on the window sill as an offering to God, since food was so scarce. One day his cat came in and ate the butter. To remedy this, he began tying the cat to the bedpost each day before the quiet time. This man was so revered for his piety that others joined him as disciples and worshipped as he did. Generations later, long after the holy man was dead, his followers placed an offering of butter on the window sill during their time of prayer and meditation. Furthermore, each one bought a cat and tied it to the bedpost.

    Source Unknown.


    William Poteet wrote in The Pentecostal Minister how in 1903 the Russian Czar noticed a sentry posted for no apparent reason on the Kremlin grounds. Upon inquiry, he discovered that in 1776 Catherine the Great found there the first flower of spring. "Post a sentry here," she commanded, "so that no one tramples that flower under foot!" Some traditions die hard. 

    Leadership, Summer, 1989, p. 43.


    Tradition is the living faith of those now dead.                                                                          Traditionalism is the dead faith of those still living.

     Jaroslav Pelikan, The Vindication of Tradition, p. 65.