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    RECIPROCITY

    Chuck Swindoll tells the story of a young boy who lived with his grandfather high in the Swiss Alps. Often, just to hear the echo of his voice, the boy would go outside, cup his hands around his mouth, and shout, "HELLO!" Up from the canyons the reply reverberated, "HELLO...HELLO...hello...hello..." Then he would call out, "I LOVE YOU...I LOVE YOU...I love you...I love you..."

    One day the boy seriously misbehaved and his grandfather disciplined him severely. Reacting violently, the child shook his fist and screamed. "I HATE YOU!" To his surprise, the rocks and boulders across the mountainside responded "I HATE YOU...I HATE YOU...I hate you..." 

    Today in the Word, April 6, 1992.


    Many years ago two boys were working their way through Stanford University. Their funds got desperately low, and the idea came to them to engage Padarewski for a piano recital. They would use the funds to help pay their board and tuition. The great pianist's manager asked for a guarantee of $2,000. The guarantee was a lot of money in those days, but the boys agreed and proceeded to promote the concert. They worked hard, only to find that they had grossed only $1,600. After the concert the two boys told the great artist the bad news. They gave him the entire $1,600, along with a promissory note for $400, explaining that they would earn the amount at the earliest possible moment and send the money to him. It looked like the end of their college careers.

    "No, boys," replied Padarewski, "that won't do." Then, tearing the note in two, he returned the money to them as well. "Now," he told the, "take out of this $1,600 all of your expenses, and keep for each of you 10 percent of the balance for your work. Let me have the rest."

    The years rolled by -- World War I came and went. Padarewski, now premier of Poland, was striving to feed thousands of starving people in his native land. There was only one man in the world who could help him, Herbert Hoover, who was in charge of the U.S. Food and Relief Bureau. Hoover responded and soon thousands of tons of food were sent to Poland.

    After the starving people were fed, Padarewski journeyed to Paris to thank Hoover for the relief sent him. "That's all right, Mr. Padarewski," was Hoover's reply. "Besides, you don't remember it, but you helped me once when I was a student at college, and I was in trouble." 

    Bits & Pieces, August 22, 1991.