Join Now: 1-800-777-7731
Home  |  Contact Us  |  About Us         Join eSermons
Log In Sign Up Now! Free Demo How To Use eSermons Memberhip Benefits

One Campaign
Sermon Samples
Contact Us
Special Sections
Member Log In
User Name: Password: Log In Join eSermons |  Help

SermonIllustrations.com
A       B       C       D       E       F       G       H       I      
J       K       L       M       N       O       P       Q       R      
S       T       U       V       W       X       Y       Z      
For even more resources
click here to join Sermons.com today!

  Join our FREE Illustrations Newsletter: Privacy Policy

    LOSS

    The great composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) lived much of his life in fear of deafness. He was concerned because he felt the sense of hearing was essential to creating music of lasting value.

    When Beethoven discovered that the thing he feared most was coming rapidly upon him, he was almost frantic with anxiety. He consulted doctors and tried every possible remedy. But the deafness increased until at last all hearing was gone.

    Beethoven finally found the strength he needed to go on despite his great loss. To everyone's amazement, he wrote some of his grandest music after he became totally deaf. With all distractions shut out, melodies flooded in on him as fast as his pen could write them down. His deafness became a great asset. 

    Daily Walk, August 9, 1993.


    When William Sangster was told he was dying of progressive muscular atrophy, he made four resolutions and faithfully kept them: 1) I will never complain; 2) I will keep the home bright; 3) I will count my blessings; 4) I will try to turn it to gain.

    W. Wiersbe, Wycliffe Handbook of Preaching & Preachers, p. 215.


    William Sangster visited a young girl in the hospital who was going blind. "God is going to take my sight away," she told the pastor. After a long pause, Sangster said, "Don't let Him, Jessie. Give it to Him. Try to pray this prayer: 'Father, if for any reason I must lose my sight, help me to give it to you.'"

    When Jessie returned to church she had a guide dog with her. The dog used to sleep during the first 20 minutes of the sermon and then wake up and howl. When it saw that its howling did not silence the preacher, it went back to sleep! 

    W. Wiersbe, Wycliffe Handbook of Preaching & Preachers, p. 215.


    A miserable looking woman recognized F.B. Meyer of the train and ventured to share her burden with him. For years she had cared for a crippled daughter who brought great joy to her life. She made tea for her each morning, then left for work, knowing that in the evening the daughter would be there when she arrived home.

    But the daughter had died, and the grieving mother was alone and miserable. Home was not "home" anymore. Meyer gave her wise counsel. "When you get home and put the key in the door," he said, "say aloud, 'Jesus, I know You are here!' and be ready to greet Him directly when you open the door. And as you light the fire tell Him what has happened during the day; if anybody has been kind, tell Him; if anybody has been unkind, tell Him, just as you would have told your daughter. At night stretch out your hand in the darkness and say, 'Jesus, I know You are here!'"

    Some months later, Meyer was back in that neighborhood and met the woman again, but he did not recognize her. Her face radiated joy instead of announcing misery. "I did as you told me," she said, "and it has made all the difference in my life, and now I feel I know Him." 

    W. Wiersbe, The Wycliffe Handbook of Preaching & Preachers,  p. 194.


    Elena Bonner, wife of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, says that as he wrote his memoirs she typed, edited, and nursed the work, doing everything she could to make sure it survived seizure by the government. Sakharov worked on his memoirs in Gorky, rewriting sections because they kept vanishing. Then one day he met Elena at the train station and with trembling lips told her, "They stole it." She says he looked like a man who had just learned of the death of a close friend. But after a few days, Sakharov returned to his work. According to his wife, each time he rewrote his memoirs there was something new--something better.

    Today in the Word, January, 1991, p. 34.