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    GOD, nature of

    I am spellbound by the intensity of Jesus' emotions: not a twinge of pity, but heartbroken compassion; not a passing irritation, but terrifying anger; not a silent tear, but groans of anguish; not a weak smile, but ecstatic celebration. Jesus' emotions are like a mountain river cascading with clear water. My emotions are more like a muddy foam or a feeble trickle.

    G. Walter Hansenin, Christianity Today.


    While my young son Doug was looking at a full moon, he asked, "Mom, is God in the moon?" I explained that God is everywhere. "Is he in my tummy?" Doug wanted to know. "Well, sort of," I responded, not sure where these questions wee leading. Then Doug declared, "God wants a banana."

    Buff Spies, in Reader's Digest, November 1991.


    The early church leader Augustine was once accosted by a heathen who showed him his idol and said, "Here is my god; where is thine?" Augustine replied, "I cannot show you my God; not because there is no God to show but because you have no eyes to see Him."

    Unknown.


    I have observed the power of the watermelon seed. It has the power of drawing from the ground and through itself 200,000 times its weight. When you can tell me how it takes this material and out of it colors an outside surface beyond the imitation of art, and then forms inside of it a white rind and within that again a red heart, thickly inlaid with black seeds, each one of which in turn is capable of drawing through itself 200,000 times its weight--when you can explain to me the mystery of a watermelon, you can ask me to explain the mystery of God.  

    William Jennings Bryan.