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    In his little book Illustrations of Bible Truth, H.A. Ironside pointed out the folly of judging others. He related an incident in the life of a man called Bishop Potter. "He was sailing for Europe on one of the great transatlantic ocean liners. When he went on board, he found that another passenger was to share the cabin with him. After going to see the accommodations, he came up to the purser's desk and inquired if he could leave his gold watch and other valuables in the ship's safe. He explained that ordinarily he never availed himself of that privilege, but he had been to his cabin and had met the man who was to occupy the other berth. Judging from his appearance, he was afraid that he might not be a very trustworthy person. The purser accepted the responsibility for the valuables and remarked, 'It's all right, bishop, I'll be very glad to take care of them for you. The other man has been up here and left his for the same reason!'"

    Our Daily Bread.

    As books vary from one to the other, so too do bishops.  Some bishops, in fact, resemble eagles, who sail loftily with solemn documents.  Others are nightingales who marvelously sing the praise of the Lord.  Others, instead, are poor wrens, who only twitter as profound subjects.  I belong to the last category.

    Pope John Paul I in a letter to Mark Twain.